What other countries can learn from Singapore’s schools

What other countries can learn from Singapore’s schools

WHEN the island of Singapore became an independent country in 1965, it had few friends and even fewer natural resources. How did it become one of the world’s great trading and financial centres? The strategy, explained Lee Kuan Yew, its first prime minister, was “to develop Singapore’s only available natural resource: its people”. Today Singapore’s education system is considered the best in the world. The country consistently ranks at the top of the OECD’s Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), a triennial test of 15-year-olds in dozens of countries, in…

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Five things Irish schools could learn from the Netherlands

Five things Irish schools could learn from the Netherlands

Margaret Kearns with her husband and four children in Amsterdam, where the family have lived for six years. Several recent reports have found that Dutch teens are among the happiest in the world, and having lived here for almost six years with my family, I have to concur. When we arrived here, we had no idea how it would unfold: moving abroad with a family and no social support, to a new culture, new language and new country. We thought we would stay for three to five years, travel and…

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How schools are failing working parents — and how some are helping

How schools are failing working parents — and how some are helping

how schools fail working parents (Lidan Chen/for The Washington Post) I had gritted my teeth through most of the school-related demands at odds with my working mom life. The midmorning concerts and late-afternoon ­parent-teacher conferences. The mandatory “volunteer” slots at after-school drama club rehearsals. The half days that, for some reason, preceded every school vacation. The final straw came when a new after-school program didn’t have space for my son. I vented on Facebook and quickly learned I wasn’t alone. I heard from fellow working parents who had plenty of…

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